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Farmworker Justice is a nonprofit organization that seeks to empower migrant and seasonal farmworkers to improve their living and working conditions, immigration status, health, occupational safety, and access to justice.

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December 23, 2014

Learn how Farmworker Justice helps farmworkers improve their living and working conditions. Highlights include:

 

- Immigration Reform Update: Deferred Deportation and Farmworkers

- Victory for Farmworkers: Remedying Systematic Labor Abuses Confronted by Farmworkers

- The Affordable Care Act Open Enrollment 2.0: Connecting Farmworkers to Health Insurance

- Keeping Up the Pressure to Protect Farmworkers from Pesticides 

November 20, 2014

Washington, DC – Farmworker Justice applauds President Obama for taking action to address our broken immigration system. Farmworker Justice has been helping farmworker organizations advocate for a more just immigration system because immigration policy has profound impacts on farmworkers, their families and their communities. The President’s administrative relief for certain undocumented immigrants will help several hundred thousand farmworker families. It also represents a step toward desperately-needed, comprehensive reform of our immigration system that Congress should enact.

“We commend President Obama for providing temporary protection against deportation and work authorization for undocumented immigrants who have strong ties to our communities. Several hundred thousand farmworkers who labor on our farms and ranches could be eligible for this administrative relief. It is sensible and within the President’s authority. With protection against the constant fear of deportation, farmworkers and other aspiring Americans will be able to contribute more fully to their communities and will be empowered in their workplaces.

“Even as we celebrate with those who will be eligible for relief, we are disappointed at the limits of the program. The eligibility criteria will deny administrative relief to many deserving farmworkers and their family members, including many long-time farmworkers who do not have U.S. citizen children.” said Bruce Goldstein, President of Farmworker Justice.

Goldstein concluded: “Immigrant farmworkers and other aspiring Americans deserve to be treated with respect and should be given the opportunity to earn immigration status and citizenship. Demands by some employer groups for exploitative guestworker programs should be rejected. Congress should pass immigration legislation that remains true to our history as a nation of immigrants.”

November 06, 2014

There are remarkably few data sets about the demographic and economic characteristics of farmworkers. Among the few studies that do exist, many have significant shortcomings. One of the better sources for over 20 years has been the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS), commissioned by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). A random sample of farmworkers is interviewed regarding their families, their jobs, immigration status, and health. There are additional categories that vary between surveys. In the past, the DOL published several helpful reports based on the NAWS data.

Unfortunately, DOL has not published a report in many years and until recently it even stopped releasing the data to the public. Farmworker Justice requested and obtained DOL’s release of the public data from the 2011-2012 surveys. The raw data is available at http://www.doleta.gov/agworker/naws.cfm.

Our staff examined the survey data to provide a basic economic and demographic portrait of farmworkers, including data related to some of the specific policy issues in which we work. We have not conducted a complete analysis of all the data. The downloadable  memorandum summarizes some of the major findings drawn from the NAWS to help inform the public, policymakers, and organizations that serve farmworkers.

Updated statistics in memo include:
Total population of farmworkers
Percentage of migrant workers
Gender and Age breakdowns
Ethnicity and Language breakdowns
Family Status
Income

Featured Blog

December 19, 2014

As the 113th Congress comes to an end, so does the closest chance that we have had to passing comprehensive immigration reform in over a decade. The prospects for immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship in the incoming 114th Congress are dim. On the bright side, President Obama’s executive actions on immigration will be implemented in 2015, including expanded DACA and the new deferred action for parents program (DAPA), which could grant deportation relief for up to 5 million people. US Citizenship and Immigration Services is expected to begin accepting applications for expanded DACA in February and DAPA in May 2015.

President Obama’s executive action on immigration is likely to face challenges in the upcoming Congress; however, any efforts to block the President’s immigrations actions are likely to be largely symbolic because Congress lacks the vote to override an expected Presidential veto. In the last couple of weeks, Congress passed and the President signed the omnibus appropriations bill which funds all government agencies through FY 2015, except for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS was separately funded until February, when the Department’s budget will be reconsidered. House Republican leadership chose to only fund DHS for two months to give them another opportunity to block the President’s immigration executive action.

In the Senate, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) filed a bill in an attempt to prevent the President from implementing his deferred action programs for undocumented immigrants. The “The Preventing Executive Overreach on Immigration Act,” is the companion legislation to Rep. Yoho’s (R-FL) bill, H.R. 5759, with the same title, which passed the House two weeks ago. Paul’s bill would prevent the Administration from implementing the DAPA program (the program which will allow parents of US citizens and lawful permanent residents who have been living in the US since January 1, 2010 to apply for deferred action and work authorization). The bill would also prevent the Administration from processing any new DACA applications, effectively terminating the program.

The Senate Judiciary Committee also held a hearing titled, “Keeping Families Together: The President’s Executive Action on Immigration and The Need to Pass Comprehensive Reform.” Prior to the hearing, UFW member Raul Esparza de la Paz participated in a press conference with Senators and other impacted community members. De la Paz said that he has one adult child who has already benefited from DACA and that he and his wife and 2 of his adult children will now be able to benefit from deferred action, removing the fear of immigration enforcement that they currently live with. De la Paz urged Congress to support the executive action on immigration and work to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

In addition to challenges from Congress, President Obama’s immigration actions are facing legal challenges from the courts. On Tuesday, in an overreach of his authority, a federal judge in Pennsylvania took it upon himself to declare Obama’s executive action on immigration unconstitutional in a court opinion that provided no basis for him to issue such a decision. The judge, Arthur Schwab, did not order the Administration to stop implementing the executive action and his ruling has no legal effect on it. The decision has been criticized because the constitutionality of the case was not at issue: neither party had argued that the President’s actions are unconstitutional nor had they briefed the court on the issue. Ilya Somin, a law professor at George Mason University writes in the Washington Post that the court opinion’s discussion of the executive action was brief and poorly reasoned. The Huffington Post reports that Judge Schwab has a checkered past. He has been removed from two cases by the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, in 2008 and 2012, a move that is rare and considered to be a disciplinary action.

There are also two pending constitutional challenges to the President’s administrative action. As mentioned in a previous update, several states have sued the President; the total count is now up to 24 states. The notorious Sheriff Joe Arpaio in Arizona has also requested a federal court to declare the President’s administrative relief programs unconstitutional and issue an order preventing the President from implementing it. The Department of Justice has asked the court to dismiss the Arpaio case. As we’ve said before, the President’s deferred action programs are firmly rooted in his prosecutorial discretion authority and many legal scholars believe the programs are constitutional. Nonetheless, we will be watching these cases closely and will keep you informed on developments.

Recent polls indicate that the majority of voters want Congress to act to fix our broken immigration system, rather than prevent President Obama’s executive action. Only time will tell whether Congress will listen. Unfortunately, statements by Congressional leaders indicate that Congress may move forward on a guestworker and enforcement-only strategy, doing nothing for the 11 million undocumented immigrants in the US. In the new Congress, Farmworker Justice will continue to advocate for immigration reform that treats farmworker communities and other undocumented immigrants humanely and in a way that comports with our values as a nation of immigrants. We will also be preparing to help implement DAPA in farmworker communities.

Immigration

November 20, 2014

On November 20th, 2014 President Obama announced his plans for executive action on immigration. We applaud the President’s action, which includes a deferred action program that provides relief from deportation and work authorization for millions of undocumented individuals, including hundreds of thousands of farmworkers and their family members.

November 21, 2014

Immigration is a critically important issue for farmworkers. Learn about current legislation proposals impacting farmworkers.

November 21, 2014

Learn about the history of guestworker programs, H-2A program for temporary agricultural work, and the H-2B visa program.