Pesticides

Monday, 25 November 2013

As we sit down to Thanksgiving dinner this week, many of us will reflect upon the bounty on our tables. While we enjoy the best of the food season, we should also remember on those who work hard in the fields, facing many dangers and often not earning enough to put food on the table themselves.

This week a coalition of farmworker supporters is launching a new campaign to keep farmworkers safe from one of the biggest hazards they face on the job: exposure to toxic pesticides.

Visit the new website to learn more about pesticides and farmworkers  and add your name to the petition calling on the federal government to fix the outdated pesticide rules that are failing to keep workers – and us – safe from exposure on the job.

Farmworkers are some of the hardest working, yet least protected, workers in our country. Many laws that protect almost every other worker in the U.S. do not apply to farmworkers. There is one set of standards, however, that is designed to help protect the health and safety of farmworkers from pesticide exposure: the EPA’s Worker Protection Standard for pesticides. Yet these standards are grossly inadequate for the men, women and children who are on the frontlines of our food production system. Farmworker Justice released a detailed report about pesticides and the Worker Protection Standard earlier this year titled Exposed and Ignored: How pesticides are endangering our nation's farmworkers.

A healthy, safe, and fair food system would benefit us all, protecting the health and serving the economic needs of farmworkers, farmers, rural communities and consumers. Shifting away from reliance on hazardous pesticides is a key step toward this goal. But as long as harmful pesticides are in use, farmworkers need better protections in the field.

Farmworkers have one of the highest rates of chemical exposures among U.S. workers. They are regularly exposed to pesticides throughout their workday in various ways, from mixing or applying pesticides to planting, weeding, harvesting or processing crops. In addition, farmworkers often live in or near treated fields, and harmful pesticides can drift into their homes. Health impacts can include both acute poisonings and long-term, chronic health effects such as various cancers, Parkinsons’ Disease, asthma, birth defects and neurological harms, including developmental delays and learning disabilities. Farmworkers’ children are particularly at risk.

Current regulations have failed to protect farmworkers and their families from pesticide exposure and harms. California farmworker poisoning data illustrate the extent of this nationwide problem, reporting hundreds of poisoning cases each year. Hundreds more — possibly thousands — go unreported due to workers’ fear of job loss and/or retaliation. Further exacerbating the problem is the fact that many states have weak or nonexistent systems for reporting poisoning incidents.

After more than a decade of broken promises and delays, EPA is now poised to strengthen the rules protecting farmworkers; but the agency needs to do so now and it needs to get it right. EPA must issue revisions to strengthen the Worker Protection Standard before the end of the year. The new regulations should include the following key improvements:

  •  A minimum age of 18 to work with pesticides. Currently teens as young as 16 may work mixing, loading and applying these highly toxic chemicals.
  •  Better and more frequent training on health risks of pesticides.
  •  Worker access to timely information about the use, location, and hazards of specific pesticides on the farm where they work.
  • Special protections for pesticide handlers.
  •  Improved enforcement of safety standards at the state level.

The farmworkers who harvest our food need protection from toxic pesticides. Safe fields go hand in hand with safe food. Add your voice and learn more at www.ProtectFarmworkers.org.
 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
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Thursday, 25 July 2013

Dan Charles for NPR recently wrote a blog about the role of pesticide labels in protecting our nation's farmworkers.

Advocates for farmworkers, especially those who grow America's leafy greens and fresh vegetables, are pushing the government to do more to protect those workers from exposure to pesticides.

A 20-year-old regulation — the Worker Protection Standard — is supposed to prevent harmful pesticide exposures on the farm. But activist groups like Farmworker Justice say it falls short, and the Environmental Protection Agency is currently working on a new version .

A new report from Farmworker Justice points out that under the current rules, farmworkers don't get nearly as much information about hazardous chemicals they may encounter as, say, factory workers. (Industrial workers are covered by different regulations, issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.)

And then there's the barrier of language. Pesticides carry warning labels that spell out health risks and how workers should protect themselves — but those labels are usually in English. More than 80 percent of the workers in the "salad bowls" of Salinas, Calif., or Yuma, Ariz., are Hispanic. Many have difficulty communicating in English.

Farmworkers "are frustrated about their lack of knowledge about these chemicals," says Virginia Ruiz, director of Occupational and Environmental Health at Farmworker Justice. Her group, along with many others, submitted formal comments to the EPA arguing that "without bilingual labeling, today's Spanish-speaking agricultural workforce is at great risk for pesticide exposure."

Pesticide companies appear to be split on the issue. One industry trade association, Responsible Industry for a Sound Environment, has opposed bilingual labels, arguing that Spanish translations were unnecessary and would make labels more cumbersome to design. The agricultural chemical company Syngenta, on the other hand, endorsed the idea.

The proposed regulations face a long road before they'd ever take effect. Once the EPA finishes its draft, the document has to go through a review by the White House before it is even released for public comment. It could be years before the regulations are final.

In the meantime, though, some activist groups (including Farmworker Justice and Oxfam America ) have joined forces with food companies (Costco!) to attack the problem on their own, through a newEquitable Food Initiative. The initiative is based on the idea that giving farmworkers more power, responsibility and money will lead to better, higher-quality food production.

The initiative has drawn up standards that (among many other things) are supposed to reduce the use of pesticides and share information — in any language — about how to handle them safely. On each farm, a worker-manager team is responsible for meeting the standard.

"The whole point is to get the team on-site to own this obligation," says Peter O'Driscoll, the initiative's project manager, who works with Oxfam America. 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
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Monday, 15 July 2013

Improving the health and safety of migrant and seasonal farmworkers and their families has been part of Farmworker Justice’s core mission since its founding 32 years ago. Today, we are releasing a new report, Exposed and Ignored: How Pesticides are Endangering Our Nation’s Farmworkers, which outlines the challenges farmworkers face in keeping themselves and their families safe from pesticides. With the release of this report and the testimonies of the many farmworkers visiting Washington this week, we call on the federal government to act now to provide important protections for farmworkers.

Farmworkers are exposed to pesticides in a variety of ways. Workers are at risk for exposure from direct spray, aerial drift, or contact with chemical residues on the crops they are picking and in the soil. Workers who mix, load, or apply pesticides are at an additional risk of exposure due to spills, splashes, and inadequate or missing protective equipment.

The EPA estimates that as many as 20,000 farmworkers experience pesticide poisoning each year but the real number is likely to be much higher as many workers do not have access to medical care nor is there a national system for keeping track of identified incidents.

For example, last year a crop duster sprayed pesticides over 40 farmworkers working in Arizona. Firefighters were called to the scene and set up a decontamination area where they had the workers remove their clothing in the cold night air and sprayed them with a fire hose. Ten workers were sent to the hospital for treatment. While this case received some local media attention, many more incidents go unreported in the press and even to appropriate authorities.

But the dangers of pesticide exposure extend beyond the field. Farmworker families, especially children, are at risk of elevated pesticide exposure. Pesticide residues cling to workers’ tools, clothes, shoes, and skin and follow them into their homes. Often, their homes are immediately beside or within the fields. Childcare facilities and schools border fields. Many pesticides spread through the air, drifting off target.

The close proximity of agricultural fields to residential areas and schools makes it nearly impossible for farmworkers and their families to escape exposure because pesticides are in the air they breathe, the food they eat, and the soil where they work and play.

The nature of working with crops will likely always involve some occupational danger. But farmworkers deserve more than the set of protections they have now. Regulatory authority for pesticide exposure is in the hands of the US Environmental Protection Agency. The regulations known as the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) have not been updated in over 20 years and are ineffective in preventing exposure in the fields. More than a decade ago EPA admitted that even when there is full compliance with the WPS, “risks to the workers still exceed EPA’s level of concern.” A decade later, those concerns should not be forgotten. It’s time to make changes. Revisions to the Worker Protection Standard are urgently needed to protect farmworkers and agricultural communities at large.

Simple revisions to the WPS should require:

-Better (and more frequent) training on health risks of pesticides and steps to avoid exposure and injury
-Worker access to timely information about the use, location and hazards of specific pesticides on the farm where they work.
-Special protections for pesticide handlers.
-Improved enforcement of safety standards at the state level.

Currently the WPS only requires farmworkers to receive general information about all pesticides but not the specific pesticides being used at their workplace. Every field uses different pesticides. Each pesticide has different health effects. Farmworkers should not receive less information about chemical hazards than workers in other industries.

Just as we establish standards and regulations to protect workers in every industry, we must address the health and safety of the farmworkers who labor each day to put food on our tables. Working and living in hazardous conditions should not be the price farmworkers have to pay to feed their families – and yours. Please call on the EPA to step up to its obligations. Now is the time to update the Worker Protection Standard. Every day we wait is another day that farmworkers are needlessly exposed to toxic pesticides.

by Jessica Felix-Romero
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