Pesticides

Tuesday, 31 March 2015

EPA proposed changes to the WPS last year, and before the public comment period closed in August, hundreds of thousands of individuals urged EPA to do more to protect workers and their families. Today again, we calling on EPA to finalize the WPS by August 18th, one year from the end of that comment period. We will deliver a petition to the EPA later today with more than 21,000 signatures from individuals around the country asking the Agency to act swiftly to prevent further injury to workers from pesticides.

The U.S. EPA’s Worker Protection Standard (WPS) provides basic protections for farmworkers from exposure to pesticides. In 1992, when EPA last updated the WPS, it estimated that farmworkers in this country experienced between 10,000 and 20,000 physician-diagnosed pesticide poisonings annually. While the 1992 revisions led to some improvement in working conditions, the WPS stills fall woefully short of truly protecting workers. In the more than 20 years since those revisions were implemented, further research on the dangers of pesticides and its effect on workers’ health underscore the urgency in strengthening these protections. 

Twenty years is too long to wait. Every growing season that change is delayed results in thousands of preventable exposures to workers and their families.
 

Follow our facebook page for updates from petition delivery event.
 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
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Monday, 18 August 2014

Today is the last day that the EPA will accept public comments on proposed revisions to the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) that provides the regulatory minimum for occupational pesticide exposure protection. Other workers who are exposed to toxic substances are covered by stronger protections, issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The result is that the men, women, and children who produce the nation’s food are less protected from workplace hazards than other workers.

Although the proposed changes to the WPS will not address all the challenges in the fields, they are a step in the right direction to prevent pesticide illness. If the final rule includes our recommended improvements, the results will include greater awareness by farmworkers of the risks they face and preventative measures; and fewer pesticide-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths among farmworkers and their family members.

The agricultural industry is working hard to dissuade the EPA from adopting the rules that benefit farmworkers the most. Today, Politico reported the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture submitted comments that “call on the EPA to scrap the proposed changes.”

Farmworker Justice and other farmworker advocates have provided the EPA with extensive information to justify stronger protections for farmworkers. Your voice is needed to make sure farmworker safety does not take a back seat to the interests of agribusiness and pesticide manufacturers.

Please join Farmworker Justice and urge the EPA to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure. You have until midnight tonight to submit comments.

Visit our website to use our model comments and submit by midnight tonight!
 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
(0 total comments)
Monday, 25 November 2013

As we sit down to Thanksgiving dinner this week, many of us will reflect upon the bounty on our tables. While we enjoy the best of the food season, we should also remember on those who work hard in the fields, facing many dangers and often not earning enough to put food on the table themselves.

This week a coalition of farmworker supporters is launching a new campaign to keep farmworkers safe from one of the biggest hazards they face on the job: exposure to toxic pesticides.

Visit the new website to learn more about pesticides and farmworkers  and add your name to the petition calling on the federal government to fix the outdated pesticide rules that are failing to keep workers – and us – safe from exposure on the job.

Farmworkers are some of the hardest working, yet least protected, workers in our country. Many laws that protect almost every other worker in the U.S. do not apply to farmworkers. There is one set of standards, however, that is designed to help protect the health and safety of farmworkers from pesticide exposure: the EPA’s Worker Protection Standard for pesticides. Yet these standards are grossly inadequate for the men, women and children who are on the frontlines of our food production system. Farmworker Justice released a detailed report about pesticides and the Worker Protection Standard earlier this year titled Exposed and Ignored: How pesticides are endangering our nation's farmworkers.

A healthy, safe, and fair food system would benefit us all, protecting the health and serving the economic needs of farmworkers, farmers, rural communities and consumers. Shifting away from reliance on hazardous pesticides is a key step toward this goal. But as long as harmful pesticides are in use, farmworkers need better protections in the field.

Farmworkers have one of the highest rates of chemical exposures among U.S. workers. They are regularly exposed to pesticides throughout their workday in various ways, from mixing or applying pesticides to planting, weeding, harvesting or processing crops. In addition, farmworkers often live in or near treated fields, and harmful pesticides can drift into their homes. Health impacts can include both acute poisonings and long-term, chronic health effects such as various cancers, Parkinsons’ Disease, asthma, birth defects and neurological harms, including developmental delays and learning disabilities. Farmworkers’ children are particularly at risk.

Current regulations have failed to protect farmworkers and their families from pesticide exposure and harms. California farmworker poisoning data illustrate the extent of this nationwide problem, reporting hundreds of poisoning cases each year. Hundreds more — possibly thousands — go unreported due to workers’ fear of job loss and/or retaliation. Further exacerbating the problem is the fact that many states have weak or nonexistent systems for reporting poisoning incidents.

After more than a decade of broken promises and delays, EPA is now poised to strengthen the rules protecting farmworkers; but the agency needs to do so now and it needs to get it right. EPA must issue revisions to strengthen the Worker Protection Standard before the end of the year. The new regulations should include the following key improvements:

  •  A minimum age of 18 to work with pesticides. Currently teens as young as 16 may work mixing, loading and applying these highly toxic chemicals.
  •  Better and more frequent training on health risks of pesticides.
  •  Worker access to timely information about the use, location, and hazards of specific pesticides on the farm where they work.
  • Special protections for pesticide handlers.
  •  Improved enforcement of safety standards at the state level.

The farmworkers who harvest our food need protection from toxic pesticides. Safe fields go hand in hand with safe food. Add your voice and learn more at www.ProtectFarmworkers.org.
 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
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